Laura-Bethia

Campbell

BFA

SERSD student 2019-2021

+46 72 011 39 19

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Profile summary

  • Stewardship
  • Rural landscapes
  • Wildlife conservation
  • Sense of place
  • Visual methods
  • Qualitative research

Laura-Bethia Campbell’s research interests include sustainable land-use, local ecological knowledge and social-ecological memory towards rural land stewardship and development

 

Campbell has joined the SERSD MSc programme because she wants to understand how a transdisciplinary, and collaborative approach can improve anthropogenic impacts on the natural environment. She is especially interested to learn how the interdependency across multiple scales and perspectives can lead to the transformative development of rural landscapes. She also hopes to learn more about the socio-cultural dimension of stewardship, and how personal relational values within social-ecological systems (SESs) inform specific stewardship practices.

Campbell has a liberal arts background and a bachelor’s in Fine Arts from Rhode Island School of Design and Cornell University in the USA. Her studio practice integrated concepts of environmental degradation, landscape change and displacement through a variety of mediums. Alongside her studies, Campbell worked with communities in the Rewa Delta district on Viti Levu, Fiji to document the social and ecological impacts of Cyclone Winston, 2016. In transition from her undergraduate degree, Campbell has worked with members of the Icelandic Forest Service to develop a conceptual land-use plan for the community of Skagaströnd, Iceland. The project focused on the revitalisation of disused agricultural land through afforestation planning. Additionally, she has participated in community-based reforestation efforts as well as behavioural monitoring of Varecia variegata at the Kianjavato Field Station in southeast Madagascar.

Campbell is looking forward to finding connections across seemingly disparate fields, and to learning how interpretive approaches and visual methods can be used to better understand place-based knowledge, especially with regards to wildlife conservation practices and landscape-level stewardship.

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