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WORLD OCEANS DAY

Saving the oceans and the science behind it

As part of the global quest to save our oceans, we present some of our latest research on the issue

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Being terrestrial creatures, much of human concern about changes in the planetary environment is focused on the land, the coasts or the atmosphere. In reality, the ocean is in many respects more important than both land and atmosphere in the functioning of the earth as a whole.

As we celebrate the World Oceans Day, we have collected some of our research efforts on oceans sustainability:

Human pressure on world's ocean shows no sign of slowing

Human pressure on the world’s ocean accelerated sharply at the start of the 21st century and shows no sign of slowing, according to a comprehensive new analysis on the state of the ocean. Read more

Inequity hampers ocean sustainability

Marine resources and the benefits from the ocean are not equitably distributed. Ocean economics is in need of a shift, report says. Read more

Identifying the winners, losers and trade-offs in aquatic foods production

Researchers have launched Blue Food Assessment, a scientific assessment that will look at the role of seafood as the world prepares to feed an world population estimated to reach ten billion by 2050. Read more

A new seafood narrative

Seafood sustainability is still only marginally considered in global policy talks on food production, trade and consumption. That needs to change. Read more

Banking on a better seafood industry

Hardly any bank loan to industries within fisheries or aquaculture includes demands for a more sustainable business approach. Doing so could significantly reduce pressure on seafood resources. Read more

Fishing for development in a sea of complexity

Evidence of a paradigm shift in fisheries development aid offers hope for future projects. Read more

Continued progress towards healthier oceans

Report from fourth meeting between world’s largest seafood companies and their quest to turn their business sector more sustainable. Read more

Cooling heated fish wars

Overfishing, fractured international relationships and political conflicts loom as fish migrate more unpredictably because of climate change. Here is how to deal with it. Read more

Plenty of space in the sea

Study predicts size of world oceans environmentally suitable to aquaculture and which areas currently most under-utilised. Read more

Stockholm Resilience Centre is a collaboration between Stockholm University and the Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences

Stockholm Resilience Centre
Stockholm University, Kräftriket 2B
SE-10691
Phone: +46 8 674 70 70
info@stockholmresilience.su.se

Organisation number: 202100-3062
VAT No: SE202100306201